Women's Experiences in the Mixed Martial Arts: A Quest for Excitement?

Philippa Velija, Dominic Malcolm, Mark Mierzwinski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Mixed Martial Arts (MMA), like the majority of relatively violent sports, has mainly been organized around the capabilities of the male body. However various indices suggest that women’s engagement with MMA is growing. The purpose of this paper is to offer an analysis of women’s involvement in MMA using a figurational sociological approach. In doing so, we draw on interview data with “elite” female mixed martial artists to explore the extent to which females within MMA experience a specifically gendered “quest for excitement.” The paper further illustrates how the notion of “civilized bodies” can be used to interpret the distinctly gendered experiences of shame in relation to fighting in combat sports, the physical markings incurred as a consequence, and perceptions of sexual intimacy in the close physical contact of bodies. In so doing this paper provides the first figurationally-informed study of female sport involvement to focus explicitly on the role of violence in mediating social relations, while refining aspects of the figurational sociological approach to provide a more adequate framework for the analysis of gender relations
Original languageEnglish
Article number1
Pages (from-to)66
JournalSociology of Sport Journal
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Martial Arts
art
Sports
art experience
combat sport
experience
shame
gender relations
intimacy
Shame
Social Relations
artist
elite
Interpersonal Relations
Violence
contact
violence
Interviews
interview

Cite this

Velija, Philippa ; Malcolm, Dominic ; Mierzwinski, Mark. / Women's Experiences in the Mixed Martial Arts: A Quest for Excitement?. In: Sociology of Sport Journal. 2014 ; Vol. 31, No. 1. pp. 66.
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Women's Experiences in the Mixed Martial Arts: A Quest for Excitement? / Velija, Philippa; Malcolm, Dominic ; Mierzwinski, Mark.

In: Sociology of Sport Journal, Vol. 31, No. 1, 1, 2014, p. 66.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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