Will the Single European Market make us all richer and happier?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Explores the economic implications of the single European market (SEM). Alternative economic explanations of key issues are put forward beginning with the SEM. The SEM will deliver lower prices and greater efficiency if it stimulates competition and allows the realisation of economies of scale. Continues by exploring how EU competition policy must be applied to prevent governments and firms from frustrating the realisation of greater competition or further economies of scale. Questions of regional policy, such as will the SEM minimise or accentuate regional differences, are considered, as is the matter of whether the SEM will enhance the EU’s long‐term growth prospects. Questions of macroeconomic policy, such as should the EU prioritise the fight against inflation above all other macroeconomic policy objectives are also considered.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)322-336
Number of pages15
JournalEuropean Business Review
Volume12
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 2000

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Single European market
Economics
Macroeconomic policy
Economies of scale
Competition policy
Government
Regional policy
Inflation
Regional differences

Cite this

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title = "Will the Single European Market make us all richer and happier?",
abstract = "Explores the economic implications of the single European market (SEM). Alternative economic explanations of key issues are put forward beginning with the SEM. The SEM will deliver lower prices and greater efficiency if it stimulates competition and allows the realisation of economies of scale. Continues by exploring how EU competition policy must be applied to prevent governments and firms from frustrating the realisation of greater competition or further economies of scale. Questions of regional policy, such as will the SEM minimise or accentuate regional differences, are considered, as is the matter of whether the SEM will enhance the EU’s long‐term growth prospects. Questions of macroeconomic policy, such as should the EU prioritise the fight against inflation above all other macroeconomic policy objectives are also considered.",
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Will the Single European Market make us all richer and happier? / Potts, Nicholas.

In: European Business Review, Vol. 12, No. 6, 2000, p. 322-336.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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