Who will save the Salvors? The decline in salvage income and the emergence of the Ultra Large Container Ship and how these phenomena create uncertainty.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Published conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Purpose: This paper examines the decline in commercial salvage income from traditional salvage activities. The decline in income has occurred concurrent with the rapid growth in the overall size of the merchant fleet generally, but more specifically the dramatic growth in size of container ships and the emergence of the Ultra Large Container Ship (ULCS) class.

Research Approach: The operational challenges of salvaging an ULCS are discussed with reference to a desk-top review of literature, semi-structured interviews with key industry figures and by an analysis of a case study- the MSC Flaminia casualty.

Findings and Originality: The paper concludes that further research is needed to determine whether commercial salvage companies are prepared for a casualty involving an ULCS and whether the current system of salvage remuneration encourages commercial salvors to invest in the equipment and personnel needed to be successful emergency responders.

Research Impact: The findings of the research (new knowledge) will be shared with a variety of industry stakeholders creating a two-way exchange of ideas, concepts and research evidence and experiences.

Practical Impact: The findings create opportunities for further collaborative research as to how a change in salvage law may be achieved.


Keywords: Salvage, ULCS, ship casualty, salvage remuneration

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCILT Logistics Research Network Conference 2017 Proceedings
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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uncertainty
income
remuneration
merchant fleet
impact research
industry
research approach
personnel
stakeholder
Law
interview
knowledge
evidence
experience
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title = "Who will save the Salvors? The decline in salvage income and the emergence of the Ultra Large Container Ship and how these phenomena create uncertainty.",
abstract = "Purpose: This paper examines the decline in commercial salvage income from traditional salvage activities. The decline in income has occurred concurrent with the rapid growth in the overall size of the merchant fleet generally, but more specifically the dramatic growth in size of container ships and the emergence of the Ultra Large Container Ship (ULCS) class.Research Approach: The operational challenges of salvaging an ULCS are discussed with reference to a desk-top review of literature, semi-structured interviews with key industry figures and by an analysis of a case study- the MSC Flaminia casualty. Findings and Originality: The paper concludes that further research is needed to determine whether commercial salvage companies are prepared for a casualty involving an ULCS and whether the current system of salvage remuneration encourages commercial salvors to invest in the equipment and personnel needed to be successful emergency responders.Research Impact: The findings of the research (new knowledge) will be shared with a variety of industry stakeholders creating a two-way exchange of ideas, concepts and research evidence and experiences.Practical Impact: The findings create opportunities for further collaborative research as to how a change in salvage law may be achieved.Keywords: Salvage, ULCS, ship casualty, salvage remuneration",
author = "Nicola Pryce-Roberts",
year = "2017",
language = "English",
booktitle = "CILT Logistics Research Network Conference 2017 Proceedings",

}

Who will save the Salvors? The decline in salvage income and the emergence of the Ultra Large Container Ship and how these phenomena create uncertainty. / Pryce-Roberts, Nicola.

CILT Logistics Research Network Conference 2017 Proceedings. 2017.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Published conference proceedingConference contribution

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T1 - Who will save the Salvors? The decline in salvage income and the emergence of the Ultra Large Container Ship and how these phenomena create uncertainty.

AU - Pryce-Roberts, Nicola

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Purpose: This paper examines the decline in commercial salvage income from traditional salvage activities. The decline in income has occurred concurrent with the rapid growth in the overall size of the merchant fleet generally, but more specifically the dramatic growth in size of container ships and the emergence of the Ultra Large Container Ship (ULCS) class.Research Approach: The operational challenges of salvaging an ULCS are discussed with reference to a desk-top review of literature, semi-structured interviews with key industry figures and by an analysis of a case study- the MSC Flaminia casualty. Findings and Originality: The paper concludes that further research is needed to determine whether commercial salvage companies are prepared for a casualty involving an ULCS and whether the current system of salvage remuneration encourages commercial salvors to invest in the equipment and personnel needed to be successful emergency responders.Research Impact: The findings of the research (new knowledge) will be shared with a variety of industry stakeholders creating a two-way exchange of ideas, concepts and research evidence and experiences.Practical Impact: The findings create opportunities for further collaborative research as to how a change in salvage law may be achieved.Keywords: Salvage, ULCS, ship casualty, salvage remuneration

AB - Purpose: This paper examines the decline in commercial salvage income from traditional salvage activities. The decline in income has occurred concurrent with the rapid growth in the overall size of the merchant fleet generally, but more specifically the dramatic growth in size of container ships and the emergence of the Ultra Large Container Ship (ULCS) class.Research Approach: The operational challenges of salvaging an ULCS are discussed with reference to a desk-top review of literature, semi-structured interviews with key industry figures and by an analysis of a case study- the MSC Flaminia casualty. Findings and Originality: The paper concludes that further research is needed to determine whether commercial salvage companies are prepared for a casualty involving an ULCS and whether the current system of salvage remuneration encourages commercial salvors to invest in the equipment and personnel needed to be successful emergency responders.Research Impact: The findings of the research (new knowledge) will be shared with a variety of industry stakeholders creating a two-way exchange of ideas, concepts and research evidence and experiences.Practical Impact: The findings create opportunities for further collaborative research as to how a change in salvage law may be achieved.Keywords: Salvage, ULCS, ship casualty, salvage remuneration

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