W(h)ither the MRes now? - the case of a UK-based MRes Humanities and Social Sciences programme

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    Abstract

    Structured Abstract Purpose: This article reviews the ongoing development of the MRes - the research masters programme - since its emergence in the mid-1990s and and the publication of the seminal study in this journal which posed the question “W(h)ither the MRes?”. It does this specifically in relation to the humanities and social sciences, notes the delayed emergence of the MRes in these branches of study and possible reasons behind this. It explores the specific case of a MRes Humanities and Social Sciences (H&SS) at one UK Higher Education Institution (HEI) and assesses how this course is faring in relation to the initial rationale that drove the development of UK-based research masters programmes. Finally the paper provides practical recommendations for future MRes H&SS programme design. Methodology: The article utilises a single case design to illustrate the development of the MRes programme at one HEI. It mobilises quantitative data such as student records and exit awards, and qualitative data from course specification and documentation produced for approval events. Findings: The MRes H&SS has achieved consistent growth in both recruitment and levels of attainment. Progression rates from MRes H&SS to PhD compare favourably with that of the longer established science model. Originality/Value: The article updates and extends debates first launched in this journal about the ongoing development, performance and future of the research masters programme and is the first to explore the MRes H&SS.
    Original languageEnglish
    JournalCurriculum Journal
    Publication statusIn preparation - Jan 2019

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    @article{94281bb6dbe540a69f70ae72fb323f3c,
    title = "W(h)ither the MRes now? - the case of a UK-based MRes Humanities and Social Sciences programme",
    abstract = "Structured Abstract Purpose: This article reviews the ongoing development of the MRes - the research masters programme - since its emergence in the mid-1990s and and the publication of the seminal study in this journal which posed the question “W(h)ither the MRes?”. It does this specifically in relation to the humanities and social sciences, notes the delayed emergence of the MRes in these branches of study and possible reasons behind this. It explores the specific case of a MRes Humanities and Social Sciences (H&SS) at one UK Higher Education Institution (HEI) and assesses how this course is faring in relation to the initial rationale that drove the development of UK-based research masters programmes. Finally the paper provides practical recommendations for future MRes H&SS programme design. Methodology: The article utilises a single case design to illustrate the development of the MRes programme at one HEI. It mobilises quantitative data such as student records and exit awards, and qualitative data from course specification and documentation produced for approval events. Findings: The MRes H&SS has achieved consistent growth in both recruitment and levels of attainment. Progression rates from MRes H&SS to PhD compare favourably with that of the longer established science model. Originality/Value: The article updates and extends debates first launched in this journal about the ongoing development, performance and future of the research masters programme and is the first to explore the MRes H&SS.",
    author = "Karen Heard-Laureote and Mark Field",
    year = "2019",
    month = "1",
    language = "English",
    journal = "Curriculum Journal",
    issn = "0958-5176",
    publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - W(h)ither the MRes now? - the case of a UK-based MRes Humanities and Social Sciences programme

    AU - Heard-Laureote, Karen

    AU - Field, Mark

    PY - 2019/1

    Y1 - 2019/1

    N2 - Structured Abstract Purpose: This article reviews the ongoing development of the MRes - the research masters programme - since its emergence in the mid-1990s and and the publication of the seminal study in this journal which posed the question “W(h)ither the MRes?”. It does this specifically in relation to the humanities and social sciences, notes the delayed emergence of the MRes in these branches of study and possible reasons behind this. It explores the specific case of a MRes Humanities and Social Sciences (H&SS) at one UK Higher Education Institution (HEI) and assesses how this course is faring in relation to the initial rationale that drove the development of UK-based research masters programmes. Finally the paper provides practical recommendations for future MRes H&SS programme design. Methodology: The article utilises a single case design to illustrate the development of the MRes programme at one HEI. It mobilises quantitative data such as student records and exit awards, and qualitative data from course specification and documentation produced for approval events. Findings: The MRes H&SS has achieved consistent growth in both recruitment and levels of attainment. Progression rates from MRes H&SS to PhD compare favourably with that of the longer established science model. Originality/Value: The article updates and extends debates first launched in this journal about the ongoing development, performance and future of the research masters programme and is the first to explore the MRes H&SS.

    AB - Structured Abstract Purpose: This article reviews the ongoing development of the MRes - the research masters programme - since its emergence in the mid-1990s and and the publication of the seminal study in this journal which posed the question “W(h)ither the MRes?”. It does this specifically in relation to the humanities and social sciences, notes the delayed emergence of the MRes in these branches of study and possible reasons behind this. It explores the specific case of a MRes Humanities and Social Sciences (H&SS) at one UK Higher Education Institution (HEI) and assesses how this course is faring in relation to the initial rationale that drove the development of UK-based research masters programmes. Finally the paper provides practical recommendations for future MRes H&SS programme design. Methodology: The article utilises a single case design to illustrate the development of the MRes programme at one HEI. It mobilises quantitative data such as student records and exit awards, and qualitative data from course specification and documentation produced for approval events. Findings: The MRes H&SS has achieved consistent growth in both recruitment and levels of attainment. Progression rates from MRes H&SS to PhD compare favourably with that of the longer established science model. Originality/Value: The article updates and extends debates first launched in this journal about the ongoing development, performance and future of the research masters programme and is the first to explore the MRes H&SS.

    M3 - Article

    JO - Curriculum Journal

    JF - Curriculum Journal

    SN - 0958-5176

    ER -