When the face fits: Recognition of celebrities from matching and mismatching faces and voices

S.V. Stevenage, G.J. Neil, I. Hamlin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The results of two experiments are presented in which participants engaged in a face-recognition or a voice-recognition task. The stimuli were face–voice pairs in which the face and voice were co-presented and were either “matched” (same person), “related” (two highly associated people), or “mismatched” (two unrelated people). Analysis in both experiments confirmed that accuracy and confidence in face recognition was consistently high regardless of the identity of the accompanying voice. However accuracy of voice recognition was increasingly affected as the relationship between voice and accompanying face declined. Moreover, when considering self-reported confidence in voice recognition, confidence remained high for correct responses despite the proportion of these responses declining across conditions. These results converged with existing evidence indicating the vulnerability of voice recognition as a relatively weak signaller of identity, and results are discussed in the context of a person-recognition framework.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)284-294
Number of pages11
JournalMemory
Volume22
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Celebrity
Facial Recognition
Confidence
Experiment
Face Recognition
Stimulus
Person Recognition
Vulnerability
Person
Proportion

Cite this

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When the face fits: Recognition of celebrities from matching and mismatching faces and voices. / Stevenage, S.V.; Neil, G.J.; Hamlin, I.

In: Memory, Vol. 22, No. 3, 2014, p. 284-294.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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