Validation study of a Kinect based body imaging system

Sara Braganca, Pedro Arezes, Miguel Carvalho, Susan Ashdown, Bugao Xu, Ignacio Castellucci

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Understanding the reliability and precision of the data obtained using three-dimensional body scanners is very important if it is intended to replace the traditional data collection methods. If the collection of anthropometric data with three-dimensional body scanners is a fast and reliable process that produces precise data at a low price, it could be used for numerous applications worldwide. Many studies have addressed data collected by white light and laser based scanners. OBJECTIVE: This study provides a comparative analysis between the anthropometric data collected using a Kinect body imaging system with the data collected using traditional manual methods. Moreover, a comparison is also made between the results obtained in this study and the results of previous studies of different types of body scanners. METHODS: The Mean Absolute Difference was calculated and all the values were compared to the maximum allowable error defined in ISO 20685. Additionally, an analysis of the significant differences between the two acquisition methods was also applied to a physical mannequin, to understand how the body movement and body stance variation in human participants impacts the results obtained. RESULTS: There are few body measurements that are close to this restricted allowable error. The results were better when the mannequin was measured. Although they were still above the ISO 20685 limit, they were much closer than the results obtained for human participants. CONCLUSION: The main cause of the differences between the two methods is the time required for the 3D system to acquire the data. The involuntary body sway of human participants is more difficult to control when the time span is too long.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9-21
Number of pages12
JournalWork
Volume57
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Jun 2017

Fingerprint

Validation Studies
Imaging systems
Manikins
Somatotypes
Human Body
Information Systems
Lasers
Light
data collection method
cause

Cite this

Braganca, S., Arezes, P., Carvalho, M., Ashdown, S., Xu, B., & Castellucci, I. (2017). Validation study of a Kinect based body imaging system. Work, 57(1), 9-21. https://doi.org/10.3233/WOR-172532
Braganca, Sara ; Arezes, Pedro ; Carvalho, Miguel ; Ashdown, Susan ; Xu, Bugao ; Castellucci, Ignacio. / Validation study of a Kinect based body imaging system. In: Work. 2017 ; Vol. 57, No. 1. pp. 9-21.
@article{b65d0cccb854441b888714bae3abe0a4,
title = "Validation study of a Kinect based body imaging system",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Understanding the reliability and precision of the data obtained using three-dimensional body scanners is very important if it is intended to replace the traditional data collection methods. If the collection of anthropometric data with three-dimensional body scanners is a fast and reliable process that produces precise data at a low price, it could be used for numerous applications worldwide. Many studies have addressed data collected by white light and laser based scanners. OBJECTIVE: This study provides a comparative analysis between the anthropometric data collected using a Kinect body imaging system with the data collected using traditional manual methods. Moreover, a comparison is also made between the results obtained in this study and the results of previous studies of different types of body scanners. METHODS: The Mean Absolute Difference was calculated and all the values were compared to the maximum allowable error defined in ISO 20685. Additionally, an analysis of the significant differences between the two acquisition methods was also applied to a physical mannequin, to understand how the body movement and body stance variation in human participants impacts the results obtained. RESULTS: There are few body measurements that are close to this restricted allowable error. The results were better when the mannequin was measured. Although they were still above the ISO 20685 limit, they were much closer than the results obtained for human participants. CONCLUSION: The main cause of the differences between the two methods is the time required for the 3D system to acquire the data. The involuntary body sway of human participants is more difficult to control when the time span is too long.",
author = "Sara Braganca and Pedro Arezes and Miguel Carvalho and Susan Ashdown and Bugao Xu and Ignacio Castellucci",
year = "2017",
month = "6",
day = "7",
doi = "10.3233/WOR-172532",
language = "English",
volume = "57",
pages = "9--21",
journal = "Work",
issn = "1051-9815",
publisher = "IOS Press",
number = "1",

}

Braganca, S, Arezes, P, Carvalho, M, Ashdown, S, Xu, B & Castellucci, I 2017, 'Validation study of a Kinect based body imaging system' Work, vol. 57, no. 1, pp. 9-21. https://doi.org/10.3233/WOR-172532

Validation study of a Kinect based body imaging system. / Braganca, Sara; Arezes, Pedro; Carvalho, Miguel; Ashdown, Susan; Xu, Bugao ; Castellucci, Ignacio.

In: Work, Vol. 57, No. 1, 07.06.2017, p. 9-21.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Validation study of a Kinect based body imaging system

AU - Braganca, Sara

AU - Arezes, Pedro

AU - Carvalho, Miguel

AU - Ashdown, Susan

AU - Xu, Bugao

AU - Castellucci, Ignacio

PY - 2017/6/7

Y1 - 2017/6/7

N2 - BACKGROUND: Understanding the reliability and precision of the data obtained using three-dimensional body scanners is very important if it is intended to replace the traditional data collection methods. If the collection of anthropometric data with three-dimensional body scanners is a fast and reliable process that produces precise data at a low price, it could be used for numerous applications worldwide. Many studies have addressed data collected by white light and laser based scanners. OBJECTIVE: This study provides a comparative analysis between the anthropometric data collected using a Kinect body imaging system with the data collected using traditional manual methods. Moreover, a comparison is also made between the results obtained in this study and the results of previous studies of different types of body scanners. METHODS: The Mean Absolute Difference was calculated and all the values were compared to the maximum allowable error defined in ISO 20685. Additionally, an analysis of the significant differences between the two acquisition methods was also applied to a physical mannequin, to understand how the body movement and body stance variation in human participants impacts the results obtained. RESULTS: There are few body measurements that are close to this restricted allowable error. The results were better when the mannequin was measured. Although they were still above the ISO 20685 limit, they were much closer than the results obtained for human participants. CONCLUSION: The main cause of the differences between the two methods is the time required for the 3D system to acquire the data. The involuntary body sway of human participants is more difficult to control when the time span is too long.

AB - BACKGROUND: Understanding the reliability and precision of the data obtained using three-dimensional body scanners is very important if it is intended to replace the traditional data collection methods. If the collection of anthropometric data with three-dimensional body scanners is a fast and reliable process that produces precise data at a low price, it could be used for numerous applications worldwide. Many studies have addressed data collected by white light and laser based scanners. OBJECTIVE: This study provides a comparative analysis between the anthropometric data collected using a Kinect body imaging system with the data collected using traditional manual methods. Moreover, a comparison is also made between the results obtained in this study and the results of previous studies of different types of body scanners. METHODS: The Mean Absolute Difference was calculated and all the values were compared to the maximum allowable error defined in ISO 20685. Additionally, an analysis of the significant differences between the two acquisition methods was also applied to a physical mannequin, to understand how the body movement and body stance variation in human participants impacts the results obtained. RESULTS: There are few body measurements that are close to this restricted allowable error. The results were better when the mannequin was measured. Although they were still above the ISO 20685 limit, they were much closer than the results obtained for human participants. CONCLUSION: The main cause of the differences between the two methods is the time required for the 3D system to acquire the data. The involuntary body sway of human participants is more difficult to control when the time span is too long.

U2 - 10.3233/WOR-172532

DO - 10.3233/WOR-172532

M3 - Article

VL - 57

SP - 9

EP - 21

JO - Work

JF - Work

SN - 1051-9815

IS - 1

ER -

Braganca S, Arezes P, Carvalho M, Ashdown S, Xu B, Castellucci I. Validation study of a Kinect based body imaging system. Work. 2017 Jun 7;57(1):9-21. https://doi.org/10.3233/WOR-172532