The role of health and wellbeing in the PE curriculum

Henry Dorling, Elaine Wotherspoon

Research output: Working paper

Abstract

This paper explores the experiences of recent physical education graduates in one Scottish University with a particular focus of revealing the factors that participants perceive to have influenced their levels of preparedness to deliver Health and Wellbeing. The purpose of the study was to investigate 1) How do practitioners view their levels of preparedness as a) a probationary teacher and b) an early phase practitioner? and 2) What are the factors that contribute to perceived levels of preparedness within physical education graduates of ITE? Using both quantitative and qualitative data the study utilised a questionnaire and focus groups to examine the participants’ feelings of preparedness. Twelve physical education graduates participated in the study, with all participants completing the questionnaire and eleven contributing to the two focus group discussions.
Participants identified several factors that impacted their perceived preparedness including time spent in physical education (PE) lectures, practical activities, school placement experiences, formative assessment, feedback and tutor support. In alignment with the four categories presented by Menter et al (2010) there are clear indications of effective and reflective teaching within the views of the participants. The participants indicated that they felt prepared to successfully deliver their responsibility for health and wellbeing. The study also contends that the participants’ experiences demonstrate that there is an observable disconnect between the theory and practice during of their Initial Teacher Education (ITE). Continued study is needed to explore the participants’ understanding of practice and their responsibility within Health and Wellbeing. Recommendations for supporting the preparation of Physical Education graduates to deliver their responsibility for Health and Well-being are discussed.
Keywords: Teacher preparedness, Health and Wellbeing, physical education, Initial Teacher Education.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusIn preparation - 13 Dec 2019

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group discussion
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well-being
Teaching
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The role of health and wellbeing in the PE curriculum. / Dorling, Henry; Wotherspoon, Elaine.

2019.

Research output: Working paper

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