The impact of signposting and group support pathways on a community-based physical activity intervention grounded in motivational interviewing

Matthew Wade, Nicola Brown, James Steele, Steven Mann, Bernadette Dancy, Stacy Winter, Anne Majumdar

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    Abstract

    Background
    Brief advice is recommended to increase physical activity (PA) within primary care. This study assessed change in PA levels and mental well-being after a motivational interviewing (MI) community-based PA intervention and the impact of signposting (SP) and social action (SA) (i.e. weekly group support) pathways.

    Methods
    Participants (n = 2084) took part in a community-based, primary care PA programme using MI techniques. Self-reported PA and mental well-being data were collected at baseline (following an initial 30-min MI appointment), 12 weeks, 6 months and 12 months. Participants were assigned based upon the surgery they attended to the SP or SA pathway. Multilevel models derived point estimates and 95% confidence intervals for outcomes at each time point and change scores.

    Results
    Participants increased PA and mental well-being at each follow-up time point through both participant pathways and with little difference between pathways. Retention was similar between pathways at 12 weeks, but the SP pathway retained more participants at 6 and 12 months.

    Conclusions
    Both pathways produced similar improvements in PA and mental well-being; however, the addition of a control would have provided further insight as to the effectiveness. Due to lower resources yet similar effects, the SP pathway could be incorporated to support PA in primary care settings.
    Original languageEnglish
    Article numberfdab198
    Number of pages12
    JournalJournal of Public Health
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 12 Jun 2021

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