The development of a custom-built portable impact-testing device for assessing the cushioning properties of athletic socks

Tim Blackmore, David Jessop, Stewart Bruce-Low, Joanna Scurr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Despite manufacturer claims that athletic socks attenuate force during exercise, no device exists to assess this. Therefore, this study outlines the development of a custom-built impact-testing device for assessing the cushioning properties of socks. The device used a gravity-driven impact striker (8.5 kg), released from 0.05 m, which impacted a no-sock, sock or a basic shoe/sock condition in the vertical axis. A load cell (10,000 Hz) assessed peak impact force, time to peak impact force and loading rate. Reliability was investigated between day, between trial and within trial. Excellent reliability (coefficient of variation < 5% adjusted for 95% confidence limits) was reported for peak impact force in all conditions, with no evidence of systematic bias. Good reliability (coefficient of variation < 10% adjusted for 68% confidence limits) was reported for time to peak impact force and loading rate with some evidence of systematic bias. It was concluded that the custom-built impact-testing device was reliable and sensitive for the measurement of peak impact force on socks.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)824-831
JournalJournal of Applied Biomechanics
Volume29
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes

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