The association of metacognitive beliefs with emotional distress and trauma symptoms in adolescent and young adult survivors of cancer

Gareth Abbey, Peter Fisher, Mary Cherry, Peter Salmon, Kirsten McNicol, Bridget Young

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Purpose/Objectives: Adolescent and young adults who have survived cancer are at an increased risk of psychological distress. This study investigated whether metacognitive beliefs are associated with emotional distress and trauma symptoms in adolescent and young adult (AYA) survivors of cancer independent of known covariates, including current physical health difficulties. Design: Cross-sectional survey using multiple self-report measures. Sample and Methods: Eighty-seven AYA survivors of cancer were recruited from follow-up appointments at an oncology unit and completed self-report questionnaires measuring emotional distress, posttraumatic stress symptoms, metacognitive beliefs, demographic information, and current physical health difficulties. Data were analysed using correlational and hierarchical multiple regression analyses. Findings: Metacognitive beliefs explained an additional 50% and 41% of the variance in emotional distress and posttraumatic stress symptoms, respectively, after controlling for known covariate effects, including current physical health difficulties. Conclusions/Implications for Psychosocial Providers or Policy: The metacognitive model of psychopathology is potentially applicable to AYA survivors of cancer who present with elevated general distress and/or posttraumatic stress symptoms. Prospective studies are required to determine whether metacognitive beliefs and processes have a causal role in distress in AYA survivors of cancer.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)545-556
    JournalJournal of Psychosocial Oncology
    Volume36
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 3 Apr 2018

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