Strength gains as a result of brief, infrequent resistance exercise in older adults; a retrospective single-arm trial.

James Fisher, James Steele, Pat McKinnon, Stephen McKinnon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Chronological aging is associated with a decrease in skeletal muscle mass and bone mineral density, an increase in fat mass, frequency of falls and fractures, and the likelihood of obesity, diabetes, and coronary heart disease. Resistance exercise has been shown to counter all of these effects of aging and, in turn, reduce the risk of all-cause mortality. However, variables such as volume and frequency have become contentious issues, with recent publications suggesting that similar physiological adaptations are possible with both high- and low-volume approaches. The aim of this research was to consider strength increases as a result of brief, infrequent resistance exercise. The present study offers data from 33 (14 male and 19 female) older adults.
Original languageEnglish
Article number731890
JournalSports Medicine
Publication statusPublished - 30 Sep 2014

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Physiological Adaptation
Bone Density
Coronary Disease
Skeletal Muscle
Obesity
Fats
Mortality
Research

Cite this

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title = "Strength gains as a result of brief, infrequent resistance exercise in older adults; a retrospective single-arm trial.",
abstract = "Chronological aging is associated with a decrease in skeletal muscle mass and bone mineral density, an increase in fat mass, frequency of falls and fractures, and the likelihood of obesity, diabetes, and coronary heart disease. Resistance exercise has been shown to counter all of these effects of aging and, in turn, reduce the risk of all-cause mortality. However, variables such as volume and frequency have become contentious issues, with recent publications suggesting that similar physiological adaptations are possible with both high- and low-volume approaches. The aim of this research was to consider strength increases as a result of brief, infrequent resistance exercise. The present study offers data from 33 (14 male and 19 female) older adults.",
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Strength gains as a result of brief, infrequent resistance exercise in older adults; a retrospective single-arm trial. / Fisher, James; Steele, James; McKinnon, Pat; McKinnon, Stephen .

In: Sports Medicine, 30.09.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - Chronological aging is associated with a decrease in skeletal muscle mass and bone mineral density, an increase in fat mass, frequency of falls and fractures, and the likelihood of obesity, diabetes, and coronary heart disease. Resistance exercise has been shown to counter all of these effects of aging and, in turn, reduce the risk of all-cause mortality. However, variables such as volume and frequency have become contentious issues, with recent publications suggesting that similar physiological adaptations are possible with both high- and low-volume approaches. The aim of this research was to consider strength increases as a result of brief, infrequent resistance exercise. The present study offers data from 33 (14 male and 19 female) older adults.

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