Power v. Violence: How can contemporary art create a 'space of appearance' and generate social change?

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Published conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

How can art have a transformative social impact? How might its impact be affected by its cultural display? This essay discusses Hannah Arendt’s concept of the ‘space of appearance’ with relation to Hong Kong Intervention – an artwork in which 100 migrant domestic workers photographed a plastic toy grenade in the homes of their employers. Reflecting on texts by Hanna Pitkin and Ernesto Laclau, it suggests that art, as a space of appearance, can be politically powerful, but it must generate an antagonistic mode of engagement that forwards an open, questioning approach to the political. It argues that this approach opens up politically affective spaces within dominant social structures.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCultures of Violence
Subtitle of host publicationVisual Arts and Political Violence
EditorsRuth Kinna, Gillian Whiteley
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherRoutledge, Taylor & Francis Group
Chapter5
Pages100-117
Number of pages18
ISBN (Electronic)978-0-429-46035-7
ISBN (Print)978-1-138-62491-7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 Apr 2020

Publication series

NameInterventions
PublisherRoutledge

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