Peer and neighbourhood influences on teenage pregnancy and fertility: qualitative findings from research in English communities

Lisa Arai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Geographic variation in teenage pregnancy is attributable to social and cultural, as well as demographic, factors. In some communities and social networks early childbearing may be acceptable, or even normative. It is these places that are the focus of policy initiatives. This paper reports the findings of a qualitative study of neighbourhood and peer influences on the transition from pregnancy to fertility among 15 young mothers in three English locations. Data were also collected from nine local health workers. The findings show that, from the mothers' perspective, there was no evidence that peers influenced behaviour. However, the data did suggest that early childbearing might be normative in some communities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)87-98
Number of pages12
JournalHealth and Place
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2007
Externally publishedYes

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