Out of place in the country: Music festivals, rurality, and the English country village: Fairport's Cropredy Convention

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Published conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

In the early twentieth century, Vaughan Cornish and others developed an aural aesthetic for English town and country planning which categorized sounds as ?in place? or ?out of place?. Implicit to this was a moral geography and idealisation of rural landscapes and Englishness which deemed loud music to be out of place in the countryside. Debates over the appropriateness of popular music in rural environments have continued, with a particular emphasis placed on open-air festivals and raves which have attracted local fears and distrust. However, it may be argued that some events, such as Fairport Convention?s annual event at Cropredy in Oxfordshire, are now an integral part of the cultural identity and contemporary rural economy of their host locations. In the process, such events have helped to reposition both ?traditional? ideas of the rural idyll and its concomitant Englishness.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAnnual International Conference of the Royal Geographical Society with the Institute of British Geographers, September 2008, Royal Geographical Society, London
Publication statusPublished - 2008

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