Noise exposure of students on degree courses related to popular music

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Published conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

In recent years, the number of students studying degree courses based around the popular music industry have increased sharply. These students are regularly involved in rehearsal and recording with electronically amplified sound, in addition to the normal noise exposure to which students commonly subjects themselves. The combination of the normal noise exposure of young people and regular involvement amplified sound suggests a higher than average noise exposure risk for these students. To date the majority of noise studies on
students have focused on Ipod exposure (such as Portnuff and Fligor), and classical, orchestral and marching band musicians.
A pilot study was run with 26 students on degree courses related to the popular music industry, from both production and performance. Students were surveyed regarding their musical habits both within and external to their university courses. This was then followed by a larger study of 100 students, including questionnaires, Noise Dosimitry of studios/recording spaces and personal noise dosimitry of a sample of students. Results indicated that students were at a high risk of excessive noise exposure from both social and university music activities. Students, despite 80% reporting having received education on hearing loss, were
unlikely to wear hearing protection when in a loud music environment. 83% of the pilot study reported having suffered from tinnitus after being in a music recording, rehearsal or concert, 50% reported threshold shift and 28% reported having experienced pain or discomfort. This suggests the need for more robust education and monitoring programmes on popular music courses/
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of Euronoise 2009
PublisherInstitute of Acoustics
ISBN (Print)9781615676804
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2009

Fingerprint

music
students
recording
education
industries
auditory defects
acoustics
pain
habits
hearing
thresholds

Cite this

Barlow, C. (2009). Noise exposure of students on degree courses related to popular music. In Proceedings of Euronoise 2009 Institute of Acoustics.
Barlow, Christopher. / Noise exposure of students on degree courses related to popular music. Proceedings of Euronoise 2009. Institute of Acoustics, 2009.
@inproceedings{141bb0e02a4f4267819585493311cb3f,
title = "Noise exposure of students on degree courses related to popular music",
abstract = "In recent years, the number of students studying degree courses based around the popular music industry have increased sharply. These students are regularly involved in rehearsal and recording with electronically amplified sound, in addition to the normal noise exposure to which students commonly subjects themselves. The combination of the normal noise exposure of young people and regular involvement amplified sound suggests a higher than average noise exposure risk for these students. To date the majority of noise studies onstudents have focused on Ipod exposure (such as Portnuff and Fligor), and classical, orchestral and marching band musicians.A pilot study was run with 26 students on degree courses related to the popular music industry, from both production and performance. Students were surveyed regarding their musical habits both within and external to their university courses. This was then followed by a larger study of 100 students, including questionnaires, Noise Dosimitry of studios/recording spaces and personal noise dosimitry of a sample of students. Results indicated that students were at a high risk of excessive noise exposure from both social and university music activities. Students, despite 80{\%} reporting having received education on hearing loss, wereunlikely to wear hearing protection when in a loud music environment. 83{\%} of the pilot study reported having suffered from tinnitus after being in a music recording, rehearsal or concert, 50{\%} reported threshold shift and 28{\%} reported having experienced pain or discomfort. This suggests the need for more robust education and monitoring programmes on popular music courses/",
author = "Christopher Barlow",
year = "2009",
month = "10",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781615676804",
booktitle = "Proceedings of Euronoise 2009",
publisher = "Institute of Acoustics",
address = "United Kingdom",

}

Barlow, C 2009, Noise exposure of students on degree courses related to popular music. in Proceedings of Euronoise 2009. Institute of Acoustics.

Noise exposure of students on degree courses related to popular music. / Barlow, Christopher.

Proceedings of Euronoise 2009. Institute of Acoustics, 2009.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Published conference proceedingConference contribution

TY - GEN

T1 - Noise exposure of students on degree courses related to popular music

AU - Barlow, Christopher

PY - 2009/10

Y1 - 2009/10

N2 - In recent years, the number of students studying degree courses based around the popular music industry have increased sharply. These students are regularly involved in rehearsal and recording with electronically amplified sound, in addition to the normal noise exposure to which students commonly subjects themselves. The combination of the normal noise exposure of young people and regular involvement amplified sound suggests a higher than average noise exposure risk for these students. To date the majority of noise studies onstudents have focused on Ipod exposure (such as Portnuff and Fligor), and classical, orchestral and marching band musicians.A pilot study was run with 26 students on degree courses related to the popular music industry, from both production and performance. Students were surveyed regarding their musical habits both within and external to their university courses. This was then followed by a larger study of 100 students, including questionnaires, Noise Dosimitry of studios/recording spaces and personal noise dosimitry of a sample of students. Results indicated that students were at a high risk of excessive noise exposure from both social and university music activities. Students, despite 80% reporting having received education on hearing loss, wereunlikely to wear hearing protection when in a loud music environment. 83% of the pilot study reported having suffered from tinnitus after being in a music recording, rehearsal or concert, 50% reported threshold shift and 28% reported having experienced pain or discomfort. This suggests the need for more robust education and monitoring programmes on popular music courses/

AB - In recent years, the number of students studying degree courses based around the popular music industry have increased sharply. These students are regularly involved in rehearsal and recording with electronically amplified sound, in addition to the normal noise exposure to which students commonly subjects themselves. The combination of the normal noise exposure of young people and regular involvement amplified sound suggests a higher than average noise exposure risk for these students. To date the majority of noise studies onstudents have focused on Ipod exposure (such as Portnuff and Fligor), and classical, orchestral and marching band musicians.A pilot study was run with 26 students on degree courses related to the popular music industry, from both production and performance. Students were surveyed regarding their musical habits both within and external to their university courses. This was then followed by a larger study of 100 students, including questionnaires, Noise Dosimitry of studios/recording spaces and personal noise dosimitry of a sample of students. Results indicated that students were at a high risk of excessive noise exposure from both social and university music activities. Students, despite 80% reporting having received education on hearing loss, wereunlikely to wear hearing protection when in a loud music environment. 83% of the pilot study reported having suffered from tinnitus after being in a music recording, rehearsal or concert, 50% reported threshold shift and 28% reported having experienced pain or discomfort. This suggests the need for more robust education and monitoring programmes on popular music courses/

M3 - Conference contribution

SN - 9781615676804

BT - Proceedings of Euronoise 2009

PB - Institute of Acoustics

ER -

Barlow C. Noise exposure of students on degree courses related to popular music. In Proceedings of Euronoise 2009. Institute of Acoustics. 2009