National and urban public policy agenda in tourism. Towards the emergence of the hyperneoliberal script?

Alberto Amore, C. Michael Hall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Following the 2007-2009 Global Financial Crisis (GFC), some national governments have been pursuing a counter-reform of the public sector characterised by further policy centralisation and the 'hollowing out' of regional authorities. Public expenditure and sovereign public debt reductions have become the pretext for the implementation of hyperneoliberal development agendas aimed at the attraction of inward capitals and a further 'competitive' repositioning of major cities within a global market. Tourism and the visitor economy have been used as leverage for the attraction of capital and skilled people in the long-term development strategies of cities. This article illustrates how crises have led the way in the recent restructuring of the public sector and of destination management organisations (DMOs) in particular. Findings from national and urban development strategies recently implemented in New Zealand suggest a strong, market-driven agenda that follows a hyperneoliberal script.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4-22
JournalInternational Journal of Tourism Policy
Volume7
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2017
Externally publishedYes

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development strategy
public sector
tourism
centralization
market
financial crisis
urban development
policy
public
city
Tourism
Public policy
Public sector
Development strategy
Attraction
Agenda
economy
regional authority
public debt
public expenditure

Cite this

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title = "National and urban public policy agenda in tourism. Towards the emergence of the hyperneoliberal script?",
abstract = "Following the 2007-2009 Global Financial Crisis (GFC), some national governments have been pursuing a counter-reform of the public sector characterised by further policy centralisation and the 'hollowing out' of regional authorities. Public expenditure and sovereign public debt reductions have become the pretext for the implementation of hyperneoliberal development agendas aimed at the attraction of inward capitals and a further 'competitive' repositioning of major cities within a global market. Tourism and the visitor economy have been used as leverage for the attraction of capital and skilled people in the long-term development strategies of cities. This article illustrates how crises have led the way in the recent restructuring of the public sector and of destination management organisations (DMOs) in particular. Findings from national and urban development strategies recently implemented in New Zealand suggest a strong, market-driven agenda that follows a hyperneoliberal script.",
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National and urban public policy agenda in tourism. Towards the emergence of the hyperneoliberal script? / Amore, Alberto; Hall, C. Michael.

In: International Journal of Tourism Policy, Vol. 7, No. 1, 2017, p. 4-22.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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