Heavier- and lighter-load resistance training to momentary failure produce similar increases in strength with differing degrees of discomfort

James Fisher, Max Ironside, James Steele

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Abstract

Introduction: It has been suggested that disparities in effort and discomfort between high- and low-load resistance training might exist, which in turn have produced unequivocal adaptations between studies. Methods: Strength responses to heavier- (HL; 80% maximum voluntary isometric torque; MViT) and lighter- (LL; 50% MViT) load resistance training were examined in addition to acute perceptions of effort and discomfort. Seven men (20.6 ±0.5years; 178.9 ± 3.2cm; 77.1 ±2.7kg) performed unilateral resistance training of the knee extensors to momentary failure using HL and LL. Results: Analyses revealed significant pre- to post-intervention increases in strength for both HL and LL, with no significant between-group differences (P> 0.05). Mean repetitions per set, total training time, and discomfort were all significantly higher for LL compared to HL (P< 0.05). Discussion: This study indicates that resistance training with HL and LL produces similar strength adaptations, however, discomfort should be considered before selecting training load.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)797-803
JournalMuscle and Nerve
Volume56
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Dec 2016

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Resistance Training
Torque
Knee

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title = "Heavier- and lighter-load resistance training to momentary failure produce similar increases in strength with differing degrees of discomfort",
abstract = "Introduction: It has been suggested that disparities in effort and discomfort between high- and low-load resistance training might exist, which in turn have produced unequivocal adaptations between studies. Methods: Strength responses to heavier- (HL; 80{\%} maximum voluntary isometric torque; MViT) and lighter- (LL; 50{\%} MViT) load resistance training were examined in addition to acute perceptions of effort and discomfort. Seven men (20.6 ±0.5years; 178.9 ± 3.2cm; 77.1 ±2.7kg) performed unilateral resistance training of the knee extensors to momentary failure using HL and LL. Results: Analyses revealed significant pre- to post-intervention increases in strength for both HL and LL, with no significant between-group differences (P> 0.05). Mean repetitions per set, total training time, and discomfort were all significantly higher for LL compared to HL (P< 0.05). Discussion: This study indicates that resistance training with HL and LL produces similar strength adaptations, however, discomfort should be considered before selecting training load.",
author = "James Fisher and Max Ironside and James Steele",
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T1 - Heavier- and lighter-load resistance training to momentary failure produce similar increases in strength with differing degrees of discomfort

AU - Fisher, James

AU - Ironside, Max

AU - Steele, James

PY - 2016/12/22

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N2 - Introduction: It has been suggested that disparities in effort and discomfort between high- and low-load resistance training might exist, which in turn have produced unequivocal adaptations between studies. Methods: Strength responses to heavier- (HL; 80% maximum voluntary isometric torque; MViT) and lighter- (LL; 50% MViT) load resistance training were examined in addition to acute perceptions of effort and discomfort. Seven men (20.6 ±0.5years; 178.9 ± 3.2cm; 77.1 ±2.7kg) performed unilateral resistance training of the knee extensors to momentary failure using HL and LL. Results: Analyses revealed significant pre- to post-intervention increases in strength for both HL and LL, with no significant between-group differences (P> 0.05). Mean repetitions per set, total training time, and discomfort were all significantly higher for LL compared to HL (P< 0.05). Discussion: This study indicates that resistance training with HL and LL produces similar strength adaptations, however, discomfort should be considered before selecting training load.

AB - Introduction: It has been suggested that disparities in effort and discomfort between high- and low-load resistance training might exist, which in turn have produced unequivocal adaptations between studies. Methods: Strength responses to heavier- (HL; 80% maximum voluntary isometric torque; MViT) and lighter- (LL; 50% MViT) load resistance training were examined in addition to acute perceptions of effort and discomfort. Seven men (20.6 ±0.5years; 178.9 ± 3.2cm; 77.1 ±2.7kg) performed unilateral resistance training of the knee extensors to momentary failure using HL and LL. Results: Analyses revealed significant pre- to post-intervention increases in strength for both HL and LL, with no significant between-group differences (P> 0.05). Mean repetitions per set, total training time, and discomfort were all significantly higher for LL compared to HL (P< 0.05). Discussion: This study indicates that resistance training with HL and LL produces similar strength adaptations, however, discomfort should be considered before selecting training load.

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DO - 10.1002/mus.25537

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SN - 0148-639X

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