From Crowdsourcing to the Commons: Towards Critical and Meaningful Digital Collaboration in Museums

Alexandra Reynolds

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Museum crowdsourcing projects commonly extend the traditional role of the curator. This paper explores a range of existing crowdsourced projects and evaluates the usefulness of theories of the commons to productively subvert the curatorial role, developing truly democratised, co-created digital cultural narratives.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)49-68
Number of pages20
JournalInternational Journal of the Inclusive Museum
Volume10
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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From Crowdsourcing to the Commons: Towards Critical and Meaningful Digital Collaboration in Museums. / Reynolds, Alexandra.

In: International Journal of the Inclusive Museum, Vol. 10, No. 2, 2017, p. 49-68.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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