'Football without fans is nothing': Contemporary Fan Protests and Resistance Communities in the Premier League Era

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Published conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

This chapter focuses on supporters at the top level of English football and the way in which activism, mobilisations and networked campaigns emerged over the past 25 years, football supporters of all clubs across all levels continue to call for a greater democratic stake hold in the decision making of the game. 'Traditional' football fandom developed through the 'standing' terrace culture, which became the site for the development of the working classes to support their team 'colourfully and vociferously'. During the mid to late 20th century, English football saw intensification in supporter violence, often referred to as 'football hooliganism', which became ingrained within British societal consciousness as a social problem. The emergence of the Football Supporters Association (FSA), independent supporters' association (ISA) and new football writing to culturally contest aspects of football's neo-liberal hegemony can be juxtaposed with the emergence of a new movement in British politics which sought to renew social democracy through values of mutualism and co-operation.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe English Premier League
Subtitle of host publicationA socio-cultural analysis
EditorsRichard Eliott
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherRoutledge
Chapter7
Number of pages21
ISBN (Electronic)9781315636696
ISBN (Print)9781138640351
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Jun 2017

Publication series

NameRoutledge Research in Football

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