'Fatigued for safety? Supply chain occupational health and safety initiatives in shipping

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article investigates impacts of supply chain occupational health and safety initiatives, utilizing the case of Oil Majors’ involvement in inspecting/regulating shipboard health and safety. It reveals that while supply chain pressure has made a contribution in improving ship safety, seafarers are denied participation in the management of occupational health and safety. Instead, Oil Majors effectively pass their pressure through ship managers down to seafarers and force them to silently comply. Among the consequences are work intensification and fatigue leading to a skewed impact on seafarers’ health and safety. This article suggests that supply chain pressure cannot be an adequate substitute for what an organized workforce can achieve through effective participation in the management of workplace health and safety.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)383-399
JournalEconomic and Industrial Democracy
Volume34
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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Freight transportation
Supply chains
Health
Ships
Safety
Shipping
Seafarers
Health and safety
Supply chain
Occupational safety and health
Managers
Fatigue of materials
Participation
Ship
Oil

Cite this

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abstract = "This article investigates impacts of supply chain occupational health and safety initiatives, utilizing the case of Oil Majors’ involvement in inspecting/regulating shipboard health and safety. It reveals that while supply chain pressure has made a contribution in improving ship safety, seafarers are denied participation in the management of occupational health and safety. Instead, Oil Majors effectively pass their pressure through ship managers down to seafarers and force them to silently comply. Among the consequences are work intensification and fatigue leading to a skewed impact on seafarers’ health and safety. This article suggests that supply chain pressure cannot be an adequate substitute for what an organized workforce can achieve through effective participation in the management of workplace health and safety.",
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'Fatigued for safety? Supply chain occupational health and safety initiatives in shipping. / Bhattacharya, Syamantak; Tang, Lijun.

In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, Vol. 34, No. 3, 2013, p. 383-399.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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