Exploring the identities of Indo-Muslims in South Africa: On the hunt for national and social belonging

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Abstract

Indian migrants have been moving to South Africa for the last 150 years. Yet, amidst the predominant Black-White racial binary operating from within South Africa, pre- to post-apartheid, very little is actually known about this heterogeneous and complex community of people. In this paper, we particularly focus upon the subjective realities of 10 Indo-Muslim men, in and through their involvement in the sport of hunting. Through the use of semi-structured interviews, we grapple with their changing senses of national identity and belonging, from relatively invisible outsiders to sporting insiders. The pleasures and positions of these sporting Indo-Muslim men though does not necessarily alter their “middle-man” citizenship status more broadly
Original languageEnglish
JournalAnnals of Leisure Research
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2017

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Islam
South Africa
Muslim
national identity
citizenship
apartheid
sport
hunting
Sports
Pleasure
migrant
interview
Interviews
community
Africa
Muslims
Insider
Outsider
Structured interview
Citizenship

Cite this

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abstract = "Indian migrants have been moving to South Africa for the last 150 years. Yet, amidst the predominant Black-White racial binary operating from within South Africa, pre- to post-apartheid, very little is actually known about this heterogeneous and complex community of people. In this paper, we particularly focus upon the subjective realities of 10 Indo-Muslim men, in and through their involvement in the sport of hunting. Through the use of semi-structured interviews, we grapple with their changing senses of national identity and belonging, from relatively invisible outsiders to sporting insiders. The pleasures and positions of these sporting Indo-Muslim men though does not necessarily alter their “middle-man” citizenship status more broadly",
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