Dig in: Archaeology as a vehicle for improved wellbeing, and the recovery/ rehabilitation of military personnel and veterans

Paul Everill, Richard Bennett, Karen Burnell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In 2011, Operation Nightingale was established to promote archaeology as a means to support the wellbeing and recovery of serving military personnel and veterans. Since then, the number of opportunities for participation has increased enormously. This article seeks to contextualise the current landscape of ‘rehabilitation archaeology’ for military personnel and veterans, through the presentation of data from the largest service evaluation to be based on standardised psychological measures undertaken to date. The results demonstrate improvements in wellbeing among veterans participating in fieldwork in 2018, including a reduction in the occurrence of anxiety, depression and feelings of isolation, and a greater sense of being valued.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)212-227
JournalAntiquity
Volume94
Issue number373
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2019

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