Dig in: an evaluation of the role of archaeological fieldwork for the improved wellbeing of military veterans

Paul Everill, Richard Bennett, Karen Burnell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The process and discipline of archaeology has been used to support improved wellbeing among serving military personnel and veterans since 2011, when Operation Nightingale was formed in the UK. Since then the number of opportunities for participants has increased enormously, and positive experience of the initiative led to some of its beneficiaries establishing new, veteran-led archaeological projects in 2015. This paper seeks to contextualise the current landscape of ‘rehabilitation archaeology’ for military personnel and veterans, and to present data from the largest service evaluation undertaken to date based on standardised psychological measures.
Original languageEnglish
JournalAntiquity
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 31 Oct 2019

Fingerprint

archaeology
personnel
Military
evaluation
rehabilitation
experience
Evaluation
Field Work
Veterans
Well-being
Archaeology
Military Personnel
Beneficiaries
Psychological
Rehabilitation

Cite this

@article{671e96e3dfaa4aa6a9c075967c8a5e99,
title = "Dig in: an evaluation of the role of archaeological fieldwork for the improved wellbeing of military veterans",
abstract = "The process and discipline of archaeology has been used to support improved wellbeing among serving military personnel and veterans since 2011, when Operation Nightingale was formed in the UK. Since then the number of opportunities for participants has increased enormously, and positive experience of the initiative led to some of its beneficiaries establishing new, veteran-led archaeological projects in 2015. This paper seeks to contextualise the current landscape of ‘rehabilitation archaeology’ for military personnel and veterans, and to present data from the largest service evaluation undertaken to date based on standardised psychological measures.",
author = "Paul Everill and Richard Bennett and Karen Burnell",
note = "To note, lead author’s institution has paid for Gold Open Access.",
year = "2019",
month = "10",
day = "31",
language = "English",
journal = "Antiquity",
issn = "0003-598X",
publisher = "Antiquity Ltd",

}

Dig in: an evaluation of the role of archaeological fieldwork for the improved wellbeing of military veterans. / Everill, Paul; Bennett, Richard; Burnell, Karen.

In: Antiquity, 31.10.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dig in: an evaluation of the role of archaeological fieldwork for the improved wellbeing of military veterans

AU - Everill, Paul

AU - Bennett, Richard

AU - Burnell, Karen

N1 - To note, lead author’s institution has paid for Gold Open Access.

PY - 2019/10/31

Y1 - 2019/10/31

N2 - The process and discipline of archaeology has been used to support improved wellbeing among serving military personnel and veterans since 2011, when Operation Nightingale was formed in the UK. Since then the number of opportunities for participants has increased enormously, and positive experience of the initiative led to some of its beneficiaries establishing new, veteran-led archaeological projects in 2015. This paper seeks to contextualise the current landscape of ‘rehabilitation archaeology’ for military personnel and veterans, and to present data from the largest service evaluation undertaken to date based on standardised psychological measures.

AB - The process and discipline of archaeology has been used to support improved wellbeing among serving military personnel and veterans since 2011, when Operation Nightingale was formed in the UK. Since then the number of opportunities for participants has increased enormously, and positive experience of the initiative led to some of its beneficiaries establishing new, veteran-led archaeological projects in 2015. This paper seeks to contextualise the current landscape of ‘rehabilitation archaeology’ for military personnel and veterans, and to present data from the largest service evaluation undertaken to date based on standardised psychological measures.

M3 - Article

JO - Antiquity

JF - Antiquity

SN - 0003-598X

ER -