Associations between trunk extension endurance and isolated lumbar extension strength in both asymptomatic participants and those with chronic low back pain

Rebecca Conway, Jessica Behennah, James Fisher, Neil Osborne, James Steele

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND:
Strength and endurance tests are important for both clinical practice and research due to the key role they play in musculoskeletal function. In particular, deconditioning of the lumbar extensor musculature has been associated with low back pain (LBP). Due to the relationship between strength and absolute endurance, it is possible that trunk extension (TEX) endurance tests could provide a proxy measure of isolated lumbar extension (ILEX) strength and thus represent a simple, practical alternative to ILEX measurements. Though, the comparability of TEX endurance and ILEX strength is presently unclear and so the aim of the present study was to examine this relationship.
METHODS:
Thirty eight healthy participants and nineteen participants with non-specific chronic LBP and no previous lumbar surgery participated in this cross-sectional study design. TEX endurance was measured using the Biering-Sorensen test. A maximal ILEX strength test was performed on the MedX lumbar-extension machine.
RESULTS:
A Pearson's correlation revealed no relationship between TEX endurance and ILEX strength in the combined group (r = 0.035, p = 0.793), the chronic LBP group (r = 0.120, p = 0.623) or the asymptomatic group (r = -0.060, p = 0.720).
CONCLUSIONS:
The results suggest that TEX is not a good indicator of ILEX and cannot be used to infer results regarding ILEX strength. However, a combination of TEX and ILEX interpreted together likely offers the greatest and most comprehensive information regarding lumbo-pelvic function during extension.
Original languageEnglish
Article number70
JournalHealthcare
Volume4
Issue number70
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 19 Sep 2016

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Associations between trunk extension endurance and isolated lumbar extension strength in both asymptomatic participants and those with chronic low back pain'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this