A Sound Effect: Exploration of the Distinctiveness Advantage in Voice Recognition

Sarah.V. Stevenage, Greg. J. Neil, Beth Parsons, Abi Humphreys

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Two experiments are presented, which explore the presence of a distinctiveness advantage when recognising unfamiliar voices. In Experiment 1, distinctive voices were recognised significantly better, and with greater confidence, in a sequential same/different matching task compared with typical voices. These effects were replicated and extended in Experiment 2, as distinctive voices were recognised better even under challenging listening conditions imposed by nonsense sentences and temporal reversal. Taken together, the results aligned well with similar results when processing faces, and provided a useful point of comparison between voice and face processing.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)526-536
JournalApplied Cognitive Psychology
Volume32
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 4 Jul 2018

Fingerprint

Distinctiveness
Sound Effects
Experiment
Face Processing
Nonsense
Confidence

Cite this

Stevenage, Sarah.V. ; Neil, Greg. J. ; Parsons, Beth ; Humphreys, Abi. / A Sound Effect : Exploration of the Distinctiveness Advantage in Voice Recognition. In: Applied Cognitive Psychology. 2018 ; Vol. 32, No. 5. pp. 526-536.
@article{02f49d982c1246c4a2bfe05ab61cce71,
title = "A Sound Effect: Exploration of the Distinctiveness Advantage in Voice Recognition",
abstract = "Two experiments are presented, which explore the presence of a distinctiveness advantage when recognising unfamiliar voices. In Experiment 1, distinctive voices were recognised significantly better, and with greater confidence, in a sequential same/different matching task compared with typical voices. These effects were replicated and extended in Experiment 2, as distinctive voices were recognised better even under challenging listening conditions imposed by nonsense sentences and temporal reversal. Taken together, the results aligned well with similar results when processing faces, and provided a useful point of comparison between voice and face processing.",
author = "Sarah.V. Stevenage and Neil, {Greg. J.} and Beth Parsons and Abi Humphreys",
year = "2018",
month = "7",
day = "4",
language = "English",
volume = "32",
pages = "526--536",
journal = "Applied Cognitive Psychology",
issn = "0888-4080",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Ltd",
number = "5",

}

Stevenage, SV, Neil, GJ, Parsons, B & Humphreys, A 2018, 'A Sound Effect: Exploration of the Distinctiveness Advantage in Voice Recognition' Applied Cognitive Psychology, vol. 32, no. 5, pp. 526-536.

A Sound Effect : Exploration of the Distinctiveness Advantage in Voice Recognition. / Stevenage, Sarah.V.; Neil, Greg. J.; Parsons, Beth; Humphreys, Abi.

In: Applied Cognitive Psychology, Vol. 32, No. 5, 04.07.2018, p. 526-536.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - A Sound Effect

T2 - Exploration of the Distinctiveness Advantage in Voice Recognition

AU - Stevenage, Sarah.V.

AU - Neil, Greg. J.

AU - Parsons, Beth

AU - Humphreys, Abi

PY - 2018/7/4

Y1 - 2018/7/4

N2 - Two experiments are presented, which explore the presence of a distinctiveness advantage when recognising unfamiliar voices. In Experiment 1, distinctive voices were recognised significantly better, and with greater confidence, in a sequential same/different matching task compared with typical voices. These effects were replicated and extended in Experiment 2, as distinctive voices were recognised better even under challenging listening conditions imposed by nonsense sentences and temporal reversal. Taken together, the results aligned well with similar results when processing faces, and provided a useful point of comparison between voice and face processing.

AB - Two experiments are presented, which explore the presence of a distinctiveness advantage when recognising unfamiliar voices. In Experiment 1, distinctive voices were recognised significantly better, and with greater confidence, in a sequential same/different matching task compared with typical voices. These effects were replicated and extended in Experiment 2, as distinctive voices were recognised better even under challenging listening conditions imposed by nonsense sentences and temporal reversal. Taken together, the results aligned well with similar results when processing faces, and provided a useful point of comparison between voice and face processing.

UR - https://doi.org/10.1002/acp.3424

M3 - Article

VL - 32

SP - 526

EP - 536

JO - Applied Cognitive Psychology

JF - Applied Cognitive Psychology

SN - 0888-4080

IS - 5

ER -